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And to the Corporations for Which They Stand
One Nation Where Money is God
Made Divisible, No Liberty or Justice at All...

Sunday, June 12, 2011

Thank a Union: 36 Ways Unions Have Improved Your Life

Let's get one thing straight...

Employers and Corporations did not feel generous and decide to give you two days off every week to have a social/personal life. (We now call them weekends). Corporations did not just feel like being nice one day and give their employees paid vacations. CEOs didn't get together in a board room and say "Let's give our employees more rights at work" or "Maybe there should be laws to limit our power over an employee".

Virtually ALL the benefits you have at work, whether you work in the public or private sector, all of the benefits and rights you enjoy everyday are there because unions fought hard and long for them against big business who did everything they could to prevent giving you your rights. Many union leaders and members even lost their lives for things we take for granted today.

The right-wing attack on unions is nothing more than ignorance, lack of education, and propaganda.

If republicans would rather support corporations instead of organized groups of workers working to secure a fair work environment A.K.A a union, I ask them to walk the walk as well. Give up every benefit and right that you use that unions are responsible for.

Complete trust and submit yourself to the corporate agenda you fight for. Play by their rules with no influence from democrats or labor unions to try to force rights among the workers of this country. Dedicate your life to their life goal of making your company more money than the year before. Just understand that this may mean sacrificing the union fought rights you enjoy everyday. I mean, you don't want to be a hypocrite, do you? Like bashing unions on your union fought lunch break? Which means if you practice what you preach, you don't get a lunch break.

Corporations use to work employees 80+ hours a week, offer no breaks, hire children, offer horrid, unsanitary work conditions, paid literally next to nothing, and even murder. Not murder with a pen like they do today, but actual murder. They basically did whatever they wanted.

This is what they were like before unions. Don't take my word for it, look it up. (Links at bottom of page). If we rid the world of unions tomorrow, who is to say that they won't go right back to the way they were merely 70 years ago? The GOP governor of Maine signed a bill to repeal child labor laws this year, maybe they are going back to their roots whether we have unions or not.

So conservatives, please practice what you preach and give up all these rights and leave the umbrella of these laws for they were brought to you by unions...

36 Reasons Why You Should Thank a Union

  1. Weekends
  2. All Breaks at Work, including your Lunch Breaks
  3. Paid Vacation
  4. FMLA
  5. Sick Leave
  6. Social Security
  7. Minimum Wage
  8. Civil Rights Act/Title VII (Prohibits Employer Discrimination)
  9. 8-Hour Work Day
  10. Overtime Pay
  11. Child Labor Laws
  12. Occupational Safety & Health Act (OSHA)
  13. 40 Hour Work Week
  14. Worker's Compensation (Worker's Comp)
  15. Unemployment Insurance
  16. Pensions
  17. Workplace Safety Standards and Regulations
  18. Employer Health Care Insurance
  19. Collective Bargaining Rights for Employees
  20. Wrongful Termination Laws
  21. Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967
  22. Whistleblower Protection Laws
  23. Employee Polygraph Protect Act (Prohibits Employer from using a lie detector test on an employee)
  24. Veteran's Employment and Training Services (VETS)
  25. Compensation increases and Evaluations (Raises)
  26. Sexual Harassment Laws
  27. Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) 
  28. Holiday Pay
  29. Employer Dental, Life, and Vision Insurance
  30. Privacy Rights
  31. Pregnancy and Parental Leave
  32. Military Leave
  33. The Right to Strike
  34. Public Education for Children
  35. Equal Pay Acts of 1963 & 2011 (Requires employers pay men and women equally for the same amount of work)
  36. Laws Ending Sweatshops in the United States

So will conservatives give up all 36 of these union fought rights? Will they stand by their rhetoric that unions are thugs and refuse to take benefits from these "thugs" or will they hypocritically carry on the diatribe that unions are ruining this country while enjoying their weekends and paid vacations? 

Or...

Maybe they could just admit that while not perfect, like anything else, unions have done great things for working people that they use and benefit from everyday of their lives? 

Maybe a conservative union-hating family got to have some of the best moments of their lives while on vacation from work, and they still got to come to a job still there waiting for them, because of unions? 

Maybe a conservative can't wait for their lunch break at work so they can turn on the radio and listen to Rush Limbaugh and Glenn Back talk about how horrible unions are?

If you don't want to give up all your union fought rights and benefits at work, I understand. I don't want to either, that's why I'm pro-union and vote Democrat. 

But maybe you could just admit that unions are not demons spawned from hell, and admit the FACT that they have improved your life in more ways than one? 

52 comments:

  1. Excellent post. Remember to grammar check

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  2. Great post. Thank you!

    Because I hope this will go viral, please do have a look at paragraph three and change "granite" to granted.

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  3. I would love to repost, but I can't until you fix that pesky typo. Thanks!

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  4. If there were some way to compute how much in wages you benefit from the accumulated sacrifices of generations of union activists, then maybe management would be happy to deduct that from your pay and let you work for 1890s wages. Of course, there is no way to do that.

    And forcing you to labor under 1890s working conditions would not only be inhumane, but a danger to other workers, a danger to the innocents at home, and probably illegal. So suck it up — the milk and honey you get from other people's sacrifice, I mean — and try to conjure up at least the pretense of gratitude for their grace.

    How do you think those labor laws came into existence? People don't just get up one bright shiny morning and say, Oh wow, I think I'll form some kind of club for banning child labor! No, they have to suffer through hundreds of years of intolerable conditions before they finally get together and demand laws to protect themselves from the inhumanity of bosses who care about absolutely nothing but their own bankrolls. You think those laws are some kind of automatic grant out of the goodness of bosses' hearts? You think they can't be reversed? Maybe you should send your kids off to Maine for summer labor camp. Those laws stay in place only so long as labor unions and bleeding-heart liberals are strong enough to keep them in place.

    Adapted from Discussions with a Right-To-Worker
    On the Facebook Page of Rick Snyder For Michigan

    http://www.facebook.com/permalink.php?story_fbid=10150206262228359&id=100001988732163

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  5. Ok! Typo is fixed! Sorry about that :)

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  6. Dad was born in 1910 and entered the mines at 13 as a breaker boy when his dad was crushed in a rock fall in 1923. He worked until he was 62 in the mines of Southwestern Virginia, West Virginia, and Southeastern Kentucky (Harlan County) except for a brief time during the war when he worked in Baltimore in a defense factory making planes.

    There was nothing to help my grandmother and her six kids except a 13 year old superboy. He helped (a great deal)build the UMWA into a powerful force for productive change. My mothher tended the guns at her their home. She was 17 that year. My proudest possession is a group photo of a Union Rep gathering in Columbus Ohio where Dad and his brother flank John L. "Damn right Shaft's a bad...hush your mouth." It will come to that again.

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  7. I absolutely love this post and the people of this country that do not understand unions have to really stop and think about the 36 things that unions have brought to our lives. Without unions, this country would be far worse off and the people of the United States of America would not have the quality of life that we enjoy today. Great job!

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  8. This is very well said, love your blog :) Mine is in its infancy, but I'm working on it. I also liked your post on Weiner. I wrote one too.

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  9. One typo? There are at least a dozen grammar, spelling, usage, tense, capitalization errors. I support your message completely and I love your passion, but you need some tough love here. Whether you like it or not, if you want others to take you seriously, you're going to have to improve your writing mechanical skills. Your credibility is diminished by your presentation.

    PS to WitsandVinegar: It wasn't "well said" because s/he didn't say anything. It was written, not spoken.

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  10. You take credit for 36 things, but offer no proof. Your labor long on labels on not much on substance. Organized labor once supported many a conservative candidate, and respected their own rank and file. No longer apparently, given the tone of this post. Organized labor was once heavily involved in the free speech movement and drew great strength from it. You have retreated into a partisan, narrow, poorly defended pigeon hole. Don't blame those who don't follow.

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  11. Oldcollgeprof - I'm not a professional writer as you already know. :) I just rant, put a picture in, and call it day. I'm sorry if it turns people off and prevents them from understanding the message. I'll try to be more careful... :)

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  12. aircrew53 - I factcheck everything I say. If you feel I'm wrong about something you are more then welcome to prove me wrong using facts. And yes... Republicans loved unions until I wrote this post. lol. A more sane republican party a long time ago supported workers and their rights, but those days are long gone. I'm simply defending unions from the partisan attacks against them from republicans. Oh.. by the way, this is my most successful blog yet and has brought me more followers than I ever expected, but thanks for the advise.

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  13. Cletis L. Stump - Wow! a lot of history there! The founding days of unionization in America.

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  14. The partisan attacks on this page are yours alone, and all unnecessary. The purpose of organizing labor is to represent their views, not give them marching orders.

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  15. aircrew53 - Who is giving marching orders? Unions fight locally and legislatively for worker's rights. They donate heavily to democrats because the other party would do away with them completely if they could. Agree with them or not, why would a union donate to a party that aims to destroy them? Unions fought for all 36 things that I listed. If I sound partisan to you, I guess that's because I stand with workers over the republican party that has waged a war on unions decades ago. You act like I'm instigating something that has been going on long before I was born.

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  16. As a former member of the AFL-CIO, I can say no you don't stand with us, more like over us. You doll up one bunch of liars by trying to compare them to another bunch of liars. Twice zero is still zero.
    The union was constantly leaned on to support whomever someone besides the rank and file decided on. It was only our dues, so why bother asking us?
    Ideologs we never needed.

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  17. To: Oldcollegeprof

    Of what department are you an 'old prof?' Geology, maybe? Not English, though 'cause English profs use dictionaries.

    "Say" or "said" is not restricted to oral utterances. E.g. (see, especially, 3,b.):

    QUOTE
    Definition of SAY

    transitive verb
    1a : to express in words : state
    b : to state as opinion or belief : declare
    2a : utter, pronounce
    b : recite, repeat {say your prayers}
    3a : indicate, show {the clock says five minutes after twelve}
    b : to give expression to : communicate (a glance that said all that was necessary}
    END QUOTE

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  18. Along the same lines, perhaps, it is worth noting that corporations outspend unions in lobbying the fed government 47 to 1.

    http://rjw-progressive.blogspot.com/2010/09/lets-take-back-our-government.html

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  19. Unions have been in decline, not because of one party, but because their leaders needed to be voted out and managed to hold on way too long.

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  20. aircrew53 - Well as a current member of the working/poor in America, I'm going to have to disagree. Frankly, I'm not even sure what we're arguing about anymore... You said I was wrong in listing 36 ways that unions have improved our lives, I'd love to know which ones I'm wrong on? Which if the things I listed were unions NOT responsible for in one way or another?

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  21. You offered no proof. In other words you expect everyone to take it on faith. You are apparently not a member of a union. There is no better teacher than experience, maybe you need to live out your dream and organize a shop somewhere. It would be interesting to see how that turns out.

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  22. aircrew53- did you not see the list of sources?

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  23. Saw the list, missed the footnotes, cites, etc. Lists are just that, lists.

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  24. I appreciate this post because it was informative of what we have gained from the unions. My question is what is their purpose today? I think they have certainly provided good benefits over time but now what? We have those 36 things and they're great. I've never been part of a union and have no desire to ever be so. If I'm doing a good job and feel I'm not being compensated for it, I address that. If my benefits aren't satisfactory for my needs, I look for better benefits somewhere else. The idea of paying dues to an organization to fight my battles for me seems lazy and if I don't have any battles for them to fight and yet I still pay them I'd consider myself an idiot. What am I missing?

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  25. Andy, what are unions good for now? Helping us keep those hard-won job benefits.

    >> If I'm doing a good job and feel I'm not being compensated for it, I address that. If my benefits aren't satisfactory for my needs, I look for better benefits somewhere else.

    Most people don't have the luxury of going job shopping and hopping.

    BTW - have you actually changed jobs for better pay and/or benefits in the past few years? Or are you talking theory?

    >>The idea of paying dues to an organization to fight my battles for me seems lazy and if I don't have any battles for them to fight and yet I still pay them I'd consider myself an idiot. What am I missing?

    It sounds as if you're one of the lucky few and don't need unions.

    BUT: Very few people have much job mobility right now, and the power to bargain for benefits is rare in today's world.

    BTW, if it hadn't been for unions, there would be no benefits for you to go shopping for, no benefits for anyone except the most elite. Those benefits have been hard won.

    Also, for the average American, wages and benefits have been pretty much stagnant over the last 30 years. Just about the same time period that conservatives have been so successful in denigrating unions and corporations in gutting them.

    In the early days of union organizing, the Supreme Court ruled against them on the ground that they interfered with each worker's "freedom of contract."

    The Supreme Court of that day seemed to be under the impression that, say, some steel worker in Pittsburgh or Birmingham, or some coal miner in Appalachia, could sit down with the employment office of US Steel or Peabody Coal and get better pay or working conditions than the guys (and children) in front of him or behind him in the employment line.

    Some people form a theoretical construct of how the world works and only look at facts which confirm that theory.

    Other people look at the facts of the world and then form their conceptual understandings.

    Unions are far from perfect, and there have been some pretty outrageous union scandals over the years.

    Organizations made up of men and women are imperfect and have problems. Unions. Government agencies. Corporations. Ma and Pa businesses. Demonstrators. TV audiences. Sports crowds. Etc.

    If you study history, you'll find that today's working conditions are vastly different than they have been in the past.

    There is no guarantee decent working conditions will continue, but unions will help protect people from losing the many layers and types of benefits we have gained over the centuries.

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  26. RJW Progressive: "Also, for the average American, wages and benefits have been pretty much stagnant over the last 30 years." This is the fault of conservatives? Really? Again NO PROOF. Maybe no understanding.

    Union membership slid because union leadership failed to deal with certain realities. Still fighting the labor battles of the thirties is like trying to beat a new enemy by fighting the last war over again. Ain't happenin'. I was in a union and it was all too painfully obvious where they were headed and in no mood to listen.

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  27. Price labor up to the point where automation displaces it is not a sound strategy for a union.

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  28. >>Price labor up to the point where automation displaces it is not a sound strategy for a union.

    And everyone saw the incredible developments of robotics coming, right?

    BTW, the autoworkers made all sorts of concessions as the consequences of automation and robotics began to become apparent.

    Let's compare that to the crashes resulting from investment firms and banks and other financial outfits buying complex derivatives from sub-prime mortgages wasn't exactly a display of master minds at work. was it?

    How about the investment communities "irrational exuberance" in the dot com bubble?



    Every form of human endeavor is prone to errors.

    We should no more gut unions because of the failure to predict robotics (and, bte, the auto workers

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  29. @aircrew:

    BTW, for someone who asks others for "proof" (even where, as with the opening post, citations were provided) -- you sure make a lot of assertions with no proof whatsoever.

    Holding yourself to a lower standard?

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  30. Not asking for proof. If you don't think it's important enough, your problem. Any assertions are based on experience as a union member and contract negotiation committee member, something the other commentors apparently don't have.

    The crashes of financial institutions is used as a diversion, not a comparison.

    BTW, not seeing the advance of automation is not what happened, they saw it, tried to skate around it. Lackluster leadership can decimate any organization. That's why the unions have been in decline and even a democratic party majority in power hasn't stopped it. Hiding from it is worse. Sometimes your worst enemy is closer than you think

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  31. I enjoyed this post tremendously and it addresses fundamental issues about the benefits of well organized labor. It is inarguable that the list above (and no doubt many other issues) was hard fought by organized labor. Mr. aircrew53 appears to be taking a belligerent stance on the opposite side of the benefit scale (asking for proof - really?) and, I think, he is missing the intrinsic point.

    I have written elsewhere (http://bit.ly/ibQP87) that "I tend towards the belief that Unions, when allowed to become too powerful, are most likely NOT a good thing (I'll repeat that - Unions that have too much power are, in my honest opinion, NOT GOOD). However, I think it should be blindingly obvious to EVERYBODY with at least some appreciation of history and maybe a neuron or two that Unions and their efforts in the fight for workers' rights have been absolutely invaluable and, in this context, it would be a disaster for ALL working men and women if they were forced out of existence by the sorts of ideological swamp-dwellers who appear to be writing current legislature" (e.g., ALEC?).

    Again, Mr. aircrew wanted proof for the responsibility of republicans for the stagnation of working wages (even though he goes on to say he doesn't want proof). In actuality, what is freely available is 'evidence' that current lawmakers on the republican side are determined to disempower unions and working men and women (and even children) while protecting the incomes and wealth of 'achievers, job-creators, and small business owners' (whom, I am sure entirely coincidentally, are spending their extra cash in supporting the political campaigns of those same lawmakers). That the average income of average men and women has stagnated over the last 30 years while the income of the top earners has sky-rocketed in comparison is a matter of public record. There is 'evidence' that this has been the result (partly) of a decline in unionization and, consequently (again, a matter of public record) poverty has reached almost epidemic levels in 'right to work states'.
    There are many reasons why Unions have fallen by the wayside. Automation was one of them and a refusal to compromise in some circumstances was another (see the miners' strike in Great Britain), but I fail to see why their destruction, as opposed to their improvement, can possibly be seen as a sensible goal.

    Finally, keep up the good work and don't worry too much about the errors in grammar and typos. Practice will improve that. Your passion shines through and that is what is important.

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  32. Thanks for this post - I will share it! I work on state and national legislation that helps working people care for their families and I KNOW that everything we've achieved has been because of unions. Unions are even helping us pass changes to pregnancy disability legislation that mostly impacts non-union workers (small businesses). Even though unions are shrinking - along with our rights! - they are necessary because there are no other organizations that will organize us to stand up for these rights. Europeans have maternity/paternity and care-giving leave. They also have UNIONS - 65-90 % unionized workforce to our 12-13%. Keep up the good work! Hope we will see a surge in organizing.

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  33. post a picture of modern day america being sucked dry by Unions. why do you think we are broke? why do we ship jobs overseas? show me a picture of a lazy unmotivated worker with no work ethic that all of our country has turned into ..because we have Unions to protect the BAD workers...good workers don't need unions....yes, my grandfather was a coal miner. Back in the day what Unions did was important. What they do now is deplorable. And we will all soon be a colony of China...which will prove how very wrong you in your opinion...and why you have to post an old picture...today's unions are nothing to be proud of...

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  34. I left the post office the other day just shaking my head at how stupid most of the American population is...I waited forever in a very long line while two very slow Union workers took their time to help customers. One left for their mandatory 15 minute break, because I am sure standing and making change indoors in air conditioning is totally back-breaking work. That left one lazy, unmotivated union worker with very little apparent work ethic to help the rest of us get through the line before we died of old age. When I finally was exiting, I notice an automated machine they are testing to self-serve sending postal items instead of standing in line. And guess what? Because of Unions, and the outrageous price we are paying postal workers (who are not curing cancer) we will soon be using automated services ...and more Americans will be out of work. Unions served their purpose. But I challenge any of you Union-lovers to give me a modern day example of why we need them. Or at least how the benefits outweigh the total massacre of our economy today.

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  35. "corporations use to" needs to be changed to "corporations used to"...grammar check....

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  36. aircrew53
    After looking over your comments and responses perhaps your moniker should be teflon53. Everything you offer is based on personal anecdotes and opinions. The generally negative reactions to your postings should persuade you to strengthen them with facts and at least admit the credit due to union efforts. And yes, I'm a union rep and have participated in bargaining sessions. Don't be a troll, be a contributor.

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  37. Reblogging this.

    I was only once an actual union member, but I was always aware that I benefitted from strong unions, especially because my salary was tied to equivalent union salaries.

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  38. Wonderful post. I've been going on about the same subject on my blog (http://leftsideannie.wordpress.com/) I hope you'll check it out.

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  39. Actually bro, Henry Ford (great American innovator) was the one who began the 40 hour work week and 2 day weekend, because he realized that re-investing some time and money into employees pays long-term dividends.

    Don't believe me? Go do some reading. 'nuf said.

    Since I noticed those right off the bat, I'm sure there's other claims here you make that are inaccurate.

    Happy Labor day.

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    Replies
    1. the reason Henry Ford implemented the change was by "physical force" from men one of them my Dad standing on the Miller overpass and fighting to get the union in. Henry Ford did not do it because he wanted to do it he was forced to do it. He also gassed workers in 1937 and killed them when they were fighting for a living wage and safety equipment. Please need to know their history......not what they believe but what actually happened back then;

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  40. Yep, Ford it was, for all of the right reasons, not to mention Henry Ford hated the union.

    As far as the 8 hour work day, it was successfully achieved by non-union carpernters in 1835. The shorter work day demand started in the 1700's and it was for 10 hour days, it too was demanded by non-union workers.

    The union came in on it in 1836.

    People have the control to make things happen but not if they don't exercise that control; it is what makes this country great. And in a modern world, reasonable requests are accommodated by resonable people, idiots weed themselves out. We need to stop living in the 1700's.

    Unions have created monsters that will bite the hand that feeds them in a heartbeat; in a modern world they cause more harm than good. As far as thanking them, I say the people make it happen and that the people not pay for reasonable accommodations, the people exercise the great power they have and rise above, again the 8 hour work day was successfully achieved by non-union workers.

    I am siding with cookieforever on this one. I do have an idea though, I say they go over to where our jobs have gone to, where slave labor is the norm. Perhaps if they form there, they will push the companies back over here, lol.

    In my eyes, union is government.

    "I am not a friend to a very energetic government. It is always oppressive. When the people fear their government, there is tyranny; when the government fears the people, there is liberty. All tyranny needs to gain a foothold is for people of good conscience to remain silent" -Thomas Jefferson

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    1. you are wrong with your info...in EUROPE they got a 10 hr work day in 1835. we are talking united states.
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eight-hour_day
      this site shows Europe, Australia and United States and how the eight hour day came about. please tell all the history if you are going to try to convince someone.

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    2. Um, wrong. In the United States, Philadelphia carpenters went on strike in 1791 for the ten-hour day. By the 1830s, this had become a general demand. In 1835, workers in Philadelphia organized a general strike, led by Irish coal heavers. Their banners read, From 6 to 6, ten hours work and two hours for meals. Labor movement publications called for an eight-hour day as early as 1836. Boston ship carpenters, although not unionized, achieved an eight-hour day in 1842.

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  41. Hmmmmm, just out of curiosity I thought i'd research paid vacations, here is what I found:

    Prior to 1940, the initiative for vacations came from management, not union, who saw vacations as a way to increase productivity, reduce turnover, and attract and keep workers during tight labor markets, such as the 1920s.

    They were mostly given to management, initially. The plans spread during the 1920s, along with more formal personnel policies, other fringe benefits, and the view that vacations brought productivity benefits for blue-collar workers as well as managerial and supervisory employees, again from management, not union.

    They declined during the early years of the Great Depression in the face of economic pressure and diminished concerns about recruiting and turnover costs.

    It's also noted that the most unionized industries in the 1930s and 1940s had the shortest paid vacations, and that these paid vacation plans were still initiated by managers, not unions.

    Considering that the US does not have laws mandating minimum paid vacations and holidays, I still have to give it to the employer, not union, with regard to the many employees in the US who have reaped the benefits.

    So, i'm still a bit torn on who to thank really. But, good blog nonetheless, one to feed the brain with, thanks.

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  42. Labor Unions are not perfect, neither is business. What about ENRON, ripping off thousands of workers' retirement funds. It's too easy to generalize and point fingers. American Companies have forgotten about American workers and have gone offshore in search of cheaper labor, like Nike in Taiwan, making tennis shoes for 7 cents an hour. American Labor Unions have not given up on American workers, they remain here, fighting the good fight, for all workers, Union workers and nonunion workers. Remember, when workers fight amongst ourselves, the boss wins-it's the first rule of corporate warfare, divide and conquer. When workers are at each others throats, who wins, the boss, and he will fire you in a second and hire a younger, less experienced workers for half the money, then what will you do?

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  43. http://www.addictinginfo.org/2012/03/07/georgia-senate-bill-seeks-to-criminalize-unions-that-go-on-the-picket-line/

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  44. Hey great post! Every one of those thirty six things you mentioned is true, but people largely operate in such an ahistorical context where they don't understand or think to ask how things came to be. It's unfortunate, but it's true. We proudly salute our troops every day for keeping our country free, but few stand up for the worker who, in my opinion, has given as much or more in terms of 'freedoms' that we enjoy every day. But it's no different from the other aspects of American history that we don't like to talk about, like inciting coups or invading sovereign nations...

    In the future though, if you keep up the labor theme, you may want to distinguish between 'business' unions and newer 'social movement unions'...because for all the research I've done on labor and work I've done with unions (I'm an organizer for Unite Here!) The union movement has changed in myriad ways over the years, and I believe that some unions are feeling the winds of change and acting accordingly, but others not so much. I can't deny that some unions and their members ARE the 'thugs' that the right uses as a blanket for the entire movement. Personally I think some unions(we won't name names) are at times just as bad as management at actually bettering working conditions, particularly since Taft-Hartley and CERTAINLY after Reagan came into office and hijacked the NLRB. We are still reeling from that blow.

    Anyways the post made me think of a few books that people might want to check out: "Labor Law for the Rank & Filer" by Lynd & Gross; "Autowork" edited By Asher & Edsforth; "Who built America?" vol.2 (1877-present) by the American Social History Project; and finally "Ramparts of Resistance: Why Workers Lost Their Power and How to Get it Back" by Sheila Cohen...as well as "Trade Unions in Renewal" and "The Paradox of American Unionism". They are all extremely relevant to your post above and teach a great deal about the nuances of labor in America today.

    Lastly, if you are interested in social movements more broadly, social media as an organizing tool in a grim union world, and the association between KONY2012 and youth, stop by my blog: www.2012socialexperiment.wordpress.com

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  45. I have no problem feeling gratitude towards unions for contributing (not necessarily being the sole contributor) to the comfy working conditions and cushy benefits many Americans have access to today, but I think unions should also acknowledge that without shareholders safeguarding the bottom line, resisting rather than yielding to some of the union demands, companies would not survive to keep employing union workers. Neither can exist successfully without the other; corporations to employ people, and unions (which desperately need to evolve) to protect them.

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    Air Conditioning Florida

    ReplyDelete
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  48. The seventh paragraph has a grammatical error. The words "use to" should be "used to."

    http://www.5minuteenglish.com/mar20.htm

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